May 17: International Day Against Homophobia Blog Hop

It’s taken me a long time to get to this point: self-love, self-acceptance, and the ability to be open about who I know myself to be inside. I have Philadelphia to thank for being the setting against which I finally felt free and comfortable enough to be able to come out, both to myself and the people in my life at the age of 28 — three years ago. I’d suffered for a long time before that, wondering why I was miserable, hating life, always angry. But my conflict had mostly been internal; I can only imagine how much harder it is when you have to fight the world at the same time as yourself. Coming out isn’t easy, but as Anais Nin wrote, “And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” 

It breaks my heart that so many people across the world still have to hide who they are, simply because of who they love. In my writing, I always try to portray my characters as real, emotional, and beautifully flawed, and as people who have a genuine connection with their partner. In my own way, I am fighting against homophobia not only through my everyday life and who I am as a person, but how gay people are portrayed in popular media — in love and sexuality as well as emotion.

It’s a wonderful thing that the International Day Against Homophobia exists. It’s a dear wish that one day, we may all be free to live the lives we ache for, and to love and marry whomever we wish.

In honor of this Hop, I’m offering up as contest prizes three copies of my ebook, Pumping Teen Iron Cock #1. To read an excerpt, click here.

Blurb: Former nerd Drew is now a buff 19-year-old college athlete who has a huge crush on sexy jacked Gabriel, university coach and trainer. What he doesn’t know is that Gabriel’s been watching the tight teen’s physical progress with interest, and the older man plans a steamy seduction after the lunchtime gym rush is gone! Shy virgin Drew quickly discovers that there’s more than just heat in the sauna! First in the popular “Pumping His Iron Cock” series!

To enter, simply respond with a comment to this post, or in response to the following questions. Please include your email, and although it is not mandatory, I’d very much appreciate if you clicked “Follow” on this blog.

Questions for thought: Has homophobia affected you, directly or indirectly, and how? What have you done personally to be an ambassador for acceptance? How do you envision the worldview to have changed or stayed the same 20 years in the future?

You must be at least 18 to enter this contest, as the book contains graphic sexual content (well, it’s erotica, so I’d hope so, right?). Other blog hop participants are welcome to enter. Winners may choose any of the following formats: .pdf, .epub, .mobi, .lit, .htm. Three winners will be chosen at random from the comments to this post on or after May 21st.


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6 thoughts on “May 17: International Day Against Homophobia Blog Hop

  1. Thank you for being part of this hop and shinning a spotlight on this important issue.

    musings-of-a-bookworm@hotmail.co.uk

  2. Foretta says:

    Thank you so much for participating in the hop. I hope that this helps to spread the word and that one day a hop like this will no longer be needed. I have shown many of the post to my nieces and nephews. We recently have been discussing how damaging bullying is and how innocent remarks can make you be seen as being a bully. One of the things that makes me mad is when I hear…you’re so gay… pisses me off. These post have helped them already. I heard my nephew stand up to someone that called someone else a hurtful name… I was so proud. Thank you all for helping by sharing hurtful and/sad memories and your personal views/message.
    I pray one day for equality for EVERYONE not just some.
    forettarose@yahoo.com

    • Lula Lisbon says:

      Thank you for your thoughtful comment! You sound like an awesome, open-minded aunt — an amazing role model for your nieces and nephews. It also really annoys me when people use “gay” as a pejorative. It’s time this changed, and I’m glad you’re helping. I’ve emailed you about your prize.

  3. L.M. Brown says:

    Just stopping by to visit all my fellow blog hop participants. Thank you for sharing your own experiences for us. As a straight female homophobia does not reach me in every day life, but I believe that everyone should be concerned about homophobia because equality for all should be just that.

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